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Feasibility of running Fedora Atomic on a laptop?

asked 2014-09-24 03:50:32 +0000

michel-slm gravatar image

While Project Atomic is focused mostly on virtualized server instances, some of its design choices would make good sense in other settings as well -- especially being able to atomically update the base OS instead of having to process hundreds of updates on a regular basis.

How suitable is the current Fedora Atomic images for running on a (otherwise Linux friendly) laptop, and if the answer is "not", is that more of a "not yet" or "not planned"?

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answered 2014-10-03 16:43:02 +0000

Siosm gravatar image

Warning: I'm not part of the project. This is just my understanding of how rpm-ostree and atomic images works.

You will probably never be able to install more packages into the base system than what is already installed by default. Everything should go into a docker container.

Thus the host is fairly minimal and more suited for a server / cluster environment, not for a desktop environment where you routinely install new applications.

This doesn't mean that one could not make an rpm-ostree Fedora version suited for desktop environments however.

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answered 2014-10-05 19:55:31 +0000

jzb gravatar image

"How suitable is the current Fedora Atomic images for running on a (otherwise Linux friendly) laptop, and if the answer is "not", is that more of a "not yet" or "not planned"?"

Somewhere between "not planned" and "not yet"? Right now, we're focusing solely on the use case of running Docker containers in the cloud or on bare metal. The tools we're using (rpm-ostree, OStree) were initially created for a use case that you're describing, and we may get to that at some point -- but not for Fedora 21 and probably not for Fedora 22.

Note that the tools are out there and you could conceivably bake your own Atomic desktop right now. It would be slightly annoying - if you need package "foo" and you don't have it, you'd have to whip up a new tree and then upgrade to that rather than just yum install what you want -- but it could be done, and might even be a good way to roll out desktops that are really locked down.

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Asked: 2014-09-24 03:50:32 +0000

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Last updated: Oct 05 '14